Samsung Washing Machines Exploding Prompting Consumers to Push for Recall

Samsung Washing Machines Exploding Prompting Consumers to Push for Recall

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Are you a consumer operating a top load washing machine manufactured by Samsung? If so, look out, debris and water may be flying across your house and causing damage to your property and potentially harming your loved ones.

Samsung top loading washing machines can be seen in YouTube videos (posted below) and elsewhere online clearly critically damaged by what can only be described as explosions. Often times, the large volumes of water these machines contain spill near electrical cords and outlets following a shower of metal components and other hazardous shrapnel. The only thing preventing these projected washing machines from flying any further is the cords connecting them to the wall.

Sarah Price of Holly Springs, North Carolina contacted the North Star Post after one such incident. She purchased an Activewash washing machine from Samsung. “They were selling so many,” Price said, that the Price family had to have their new washing machine delivered to their home (by Best Buy) separate from the dryer, which came a week later. Two months after that the Activewash burst and flew, “three feet across the room.” Thankfully, Price and the rest of the family and their pets were safely situated in another room, but the noise was obviously loud enough for them to drop everything and investigate what had occurred. Price remarked that she was grateful her pets were not feeding at the time as their bowls are adjacent to the machine as is clear in pictures below.

“Not just Activewash. Any machine that’s had this issue needs to be

recalled. They are specifically targeting mothers with their [marketing]

campaign… if a child is following their mother and that machine goes off

[the consequences could be dire].”

Price said, “it wasn’t even a hefty load,” just a few small items, “no bulky comforters or anything.” Like any concerned mother with two small children in the house (ages 9 and 2 – soon to be 3) would wisely choose to do, Price has been corresponding with Samsung by email as well as over social media following an initial phone call. The photographs she posted of the mangled machine and resulting damage to her home were quickly taken down from Samsung’s Facebook page. Not only that, her attempts to bring attention to the problem on Twitter were met with a block from Activewash spokesperson, Dax Shepard, and with a follow from a law firm that helps businesses, “protect their assets.”

Subtle threats of legal action and corporate censorship are no way for a multinational conglomerate (based in Samsung Town, South Korea) to treat a young mother or any of their customers. Samsung boasts around 17% of South Korea’s GDP. Samsung Electronics spent an estimated $14 billion on advertising and marketing in 2013, which is more than the GDP of Iceland.

“Not just Activewash. Any machine that’s had this issue needs to be recalled. They are specifically targeting mothers with their [marketing] campaign,” Price remarked and went on to point out that, “if a child is following their mother and that machine goes off [the consequences could be dire].” It is clear as day that this megalithic conglomerate is more than able to bite the bullet and suck up any costs associated with a recall.

Sarah Price and many other mothers are wondering, “at what point is it going to take for [Samsung] to recall these machines?”

Several law firms are investigating these issues and refrained from comment as did Samsung.

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